Stremba
& Company
 
 

พาเล่นบาคาร่า_พาเล่นบาคาร่า pantip_วิดีโอสล็อต_สล็อต แจก เครดิต ฟรี ไม่ต้องฝาก 2560_เกมส์

HOSANNAH IN THE HIGHEST TREE

A Christmas Confession

25 December 2011

The past four years, Stremba's been churning out an annual Christmas story. It's a more readable addressee-friendly successor to the old PLOT THICKENS. This year's story, USPS-ed to a privileged elite, harkens back to a post-WWII boyhood in eastern Pennsylvania, an era of dramatic changes felt not just nationally but in a special way by one local parish community on the less classy side of the tracks of a steam-powered coal-burning Reading Railroad.

RESCUING A BALTIMORE LEGEND

Everything You Want To Know
About Detective Tod Hall, and
All You Need To Know
About The Portable Parlor Play Project

23 April 2008

On this day in April, 1875, young Theodorick B. Hall received an appointment to the recently reorganized Baltimore City detective squad. This, the third Detective Hall posting on this site, updates the legend with additional findings and outlines how the legend is used in a fresh series of parlor plays designed for literate adults looking for alternative fun together with other smart folks.

UP FROM THE ASPHALT

or An Anthology — Stories Off Baltimore Streets

26 September 2006

view to the southeast from the roof 3339 N. Charles St. by Art Zoller Wagner, Feb. 1972

When you retell your personal stories, how important is the setting — specifically, the street where it happened? A dozen friends and acquaintances — some city natives, the rest transplants from the other side the Mason-Dixon Line — generously recalled experiences or passed on creative pieces that have strong connections to different streets of Baltimore, downtown, uptown and out to the town limits. It's quite an assortment of subject matter, style, and tone. But it's all Baltimore.

HOW TO SURVIVE
A BALTIMORE SCORCHER WITHOUT A/C

or An Anthology of Ice-Box Stories

10 May 2006

Generations before anyone ever conceived the term "global warming," summers in Baltimore have been hot as hell. Can it get any worse? Well, come July 2006, electric rates are increasing over 70%. As a public service, we offer this page as an alternative to budget-gouging A/C (and a "screw-you!" to the utility giant, BG&E). Pour yourself a cold one and switch on these ice-box stories, collected from friends after a prompt in an earlier piece, "Dad's Truck," posted on this site.

DAD'S TRUCK

A Boy's Adventure in the Icebox Era

14 February 2006

It's the 1940s, WWII just over. It's a small city and you're a boy in a district bordered by the Schuylkill River, the Reading Railroad and Penn Street. You go everywhere on foot, and you've got this errand Mom expects you to do. A fresh block of ice for the icebox. It requires more trudging-beyond your territory. And, lo, look at that!—a truck!—idle!—an opportunity to get the chore done nice, quick and easy. This oft-told story is from the oral riches of the John and Mary Stremba family, Reading, Pennsylvania.

THE STATE OF
THE ART OF READING ALOUD, or
HECTORING THE LECTORING

A Veteran Listener's Frank Appraisal
& Disclosure of Key Tips

Summer 2005

Reading aloud. Why do so many think plain old literacy learned in grade school is adequate for the task of reading aloud? Distinct skills here. Among all the solo public readers, including lecturers, librarians, poets, politicians, and preachers, this assessment targets a special group — lectors, i.e. those who read aloud scriptural passages at liturgy. The unique approach to improving reading-aloud skills described here with its singular emphasis on how to relate physically to the page has been dubbed the Chrysostom Method.

A SOFTBOILED DETECTIVE
IN TOUGH OLD BALTIMORE, or

In How Many Ways Did Tod Hall Love His Wife?

23 April 2005

Who doesn't love a detective story? Here we have the return of Tod B. Hall, an actual plainclothes cop in Baltimore's post Civil War era. This follow-up re-publishes material originally put out for public consumption in an 1888 history of the Baltimore City police, specific sections about an 1877 case of grain shipments stolen from the city harbor crediting Detective Hall with tracking down the thieves, barge crewmen, one of whom expresses gratitude to his arresting officer.

THE STORYTELLER WHO HATES FOLKTALES

Apologia Pro Vita Sua

February 1, 2004

A storyteller faces his limitations. His forefathers and foremothers told tales and sang songs in villages along the Carpathian mountains, pieces of tradition they'd received from their forebears. But, Lord, this American descendant of old Rus' has grown into such a secular and urbanized guy he can't make their folktales and folksongs his own. God help him.

A CITY ABLAZE WITH STORIES

What's A Storyteller Do With
Baltimore's Great Fire?

Great Fire Centennial, 2004

When it comes to Baltimore, there are three big stories. Poe.  H.L. Mencken.  The Great Fire.  But it's that Fire that has been an enormous source of material yet, even more, has served as a gateway to countless other stories. You follow your nose for stories out of the dying embers of February 1904 through the extreme dust that plagues the city well into the spring. Go a bit forward, go a little back, even slipping boldly into the 19th century. It's an era Sheherezade herself could've sunk her teeth into.

HAD LUNCH WITH EDGAR ALLAN POE

In Search of A 1904 Story

Great Fire Centennial, 2004

Her first husband, Dr. John Van Bibber, had been dead over a decade already when she became Mrs. Robert McLane, a fresh status she held for just about two weeks. Her second husband's death in his 37th year made her a widow again. It's that single lethal bullet that fired my interest in the whole period.

sbobetฟรีเครดิตLADIES IN BLACK, LETTERS IN BLUE

Making Money, Making Love
in Old Baltimore

Great Fire Centennial, 2004

"Mr E. had no affection for his wife," said one of the defendant's two lawyers, "when after leading a prayer meeting one night, he was making love to Mrs R. the next day. Here's a man who has broken the heart of one woman [while] trying to break the heart of another."

TOD HALL AT CITY HALL, or
THEFT: A BALTIMORE TRADITION

A Search For Another Story

Great Fire Centennial, 2004

Who was it that was managing a ring of thieves stealing sloopfuls of grain in Baltimore harbor, then sailing it up some tributary of the Patapsco, having it milled, later underselling the flour merchants? The bare bones: it was Tod Hall's surveillance of the barges that exposed the thieves; Hall who chased them as far as Philadelphia and Hoboken; Hall who captured them, and brought them back — to justice, 1877.

HARRY & BLANCHE:
A MAN ON THE MOVE HAS A DAUGHTER

Making a Name in Baltimore, 1904

Great Fire Centennial, 2004

The 1901 Polk City Directory listed Harry, along with everyone else living in Baltimore City. Harry was white. You could tell race by the asterisk before all the names of non-white individuals. About that asterisk one friend of color commented: "Funny how generously they gave us those asterisks when what we were needing wasn't more punctuation to crowd us in but more space to move out into."

< < Home